During the 20th century in Australia, it is estimated that more than 500,000 children were put into institutional or out-of-home care under various arrangements.

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Betrayal of Trust

27/10/2014


Further important reforms to better protect children following the landmark Betrayal Of Trust report have now commenced.

As of yesterday, new laws apply requiring ministers of religion in Victoria to hold a Working with Children Check, and from today it is an offence to fail to disclose information to police where a person knows or believes that a child has been sexually abused.

Attorney-General Robert Clark said the changes to Working with Children Check laws make clear that all ministers who have contact with children in their congregation as part of their work, or who visit or take part in church schools, kindergartens, Sunday schools, youth camps or any other church activities involving children, need to have a Working with Children Check.


"Ministers of religion, regardless of faith, have a special responsibility through their work that places them in positions of trust and authority," Mr Clark said.


The new requirements for Working with Children Checks will apply to all ministers of religion unless their contact with children is only occasional and incidental. Until now, ministers of religion were not required to hold a Working with Children Check unless they had regular, direct contact with children that was unsupervised.


Mr Clark said strengthening of the requirement for ministers of religion to hold a Working with Children Check was a recommendation of Betrayal of Trust, the report of the bi-partisan Parliamentary Family and Community Development Committee inquiry into the handling of child abuse by religious and other organisations.


Other amendments to Working with Children Check laws that came into effect yesterday make clear that the protection of children is the paramount consideration for all decision-makers when deciding whether to issue a Working with Children Check clearance.

The legislation also includes clearer definitions and offence classifications, and greater powers to revoke a check where a person fails to provide required information.


Delivering on another recommendation of the Betrayal of Trust report, it is now an offence carrying a penalty of up to three years in jail for an adult to fail to provide relevant information to police if they have a reasonable belief that a child has been sexually abused, unless they have a reasonable excuse not to do so.



"The failure to disclose offence means that not only is there a moral obligation to protect children from abuse, there is now a clear legal obligation as well," Mr Clark said.


"This new offence makes clear that if someone knows or believes that a child has been sexually abused, they cannot just keep quiet about it – unless there is a good reason why not, they have a duty to tell the police what they know so that the police can bring the offender to justice and prevent further abuse."


Under the new law, adults who have information that leads them to form a reasonable belief that another adult has committed a sexual offence in Victoria against a child under the age of 16 years must disclose that information to Victoria Police, subject to some exemptions, including:


Additional information about the new laws is available from the Department of Justice .


Further reforms to hold perpetrators of sexual abuse to account have also come into effect recently, with new laws commencing on 22 October to remove time limits that previously prevented the prosecution of certain sexual offences against children committed prior to 1991.


These new laws are further steps in the Victorian Government's implementation of the Government's response to the recommendations of the Betrayal of Trust report. Other reforms that have been introduced or are being implemented include:

new criminal offences for grooming and for failure to protect children within organisations; legislating for a 'course of conduct' charge to make it easier for repeated and systematic sexual offending to be prosecuted; minimum child safe standards for organisations that have direct and regular contact with children; allowing the Commission for Children and Young People to scrutinise organisations' systems for keeping children safe; a new 'reportable conduct' scheme for organisations with a high level of responsibility for children, requiring them to centrally report all allegations of child abuse to the Commission for Children and Young People; and

requiring all schools, both government and non-government, to implement a policy for responding to allegations of child abuse.


(Source: http://www.vic.gov.au/news/betrayal-of-trust.html  12/11/2014 7:30pm)


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During the 20th century in Australia, it is estimated that more

than 500,000 children were put into institutional or out-of-home

care under various arrangements.


These people are Forgotten Australian (Care-Leavers, Wardies, Homies, Wards of the State) under the Aged Care Act, but they may also be known as, 'Former Child Migrants' or 'Stolen Generations'. Aged care has been raised as an area of particular anxiety for Forgotten Australian (Care-Leavers, Wardies, Homies, Wards of the State) given their previous experiences in institutional care.


The Australian Government has classed Forgotten Australian (Care-Leavers, Wardies, Homies, Wards of the State) as a special needs group within the Aged Care Act.


The Department of Social Services is developing an information package to raise the awareness of Forgotten Australian (Care-Leavers, Wardies, Homies, Wards of the State) by aged care service providers.


(Source: http://www.myagedcare.gov.au/eligibility-diverse-needs/care-leavers  5th of April 2015. Last updated January 2015)

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Gordon Hill Case Study 28

"...I was thrashed with a drill stick across the bare skin of my back and buttocks. About after 10 whacks the drill stick broke. I still have scars on both sides of my torso because the sticks broke on an angle. When I started to bleed on the back, they turned me around to the other side and whacked me again. I have the scars on my waist straight across from where I was beaten, and I was bruised everywhere..."

Transcript Royal Commission 2015 Case Study 28 (Day 78) Wednesday 20th of May 2015 read the full transcript here

Gordon's public submission to the Senate Community Affairs References Committee Inquiry into Children in Institutional Care, read here

Gordon's Public submission to the Victorian Inquiry into the handling of child abuse by religious and other organisations 29/1/2013 read here

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Joseph Saric evidence at the 15th of Febuary 2013 Victorian inquiry into Child sexual abuse within church and other organisational run institutions.

"…Catholic Church fooled the government of the day and the public by making nothing look like something. I repeat: it made nothing look like something. The main problem with this system is that it acts as judge, jury and executioner with no reference to secular authorities or systems. The two processes are privatised. The church is not accountable to any secular authority and there is no external review of the processes. What we need now is honesty, not more denial and not more media spin, because ultimately this has led to a flood of distrust amongst victims. The fact is that the church’s credibility, trust and respect from its parishioners has been lost on a scale more damaging than any financial compensation the church has to deliver. The question becomes: can any amount of money ever compensate for the destruction of the personal innocence and personal faith of so many victims who carry the scars of their experience for a lifetime?…"

Inquiry into the handling of child abuse by religious and other organisations Geelong — 15 February 2013 read more here

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